Be a Self Coach: Rowing Warm-Up with the Concept2 Power Curve

Using the Concept2 Performance Monitor to gain rowing feedback and coach yourself is a great use of warm up time before jumping into class.  This article will give you the ideal power curve, common faults you might see, and a couple of challenges to try in a 5 minute warmup pre-class or training session.  Here’s a quick video on the power curve to get things started.  Check it out and then read through the rest of the article for tips and challenges to try.

1. The Ideal Power Curve

Ideal Power CurveSet the monitor to display the power curve (or force curve) during your next warmup to really dial in body awareness and technique.  The ideal curve is a smooth inverted parabola with the peak located in the center of the curve.  If you can make this happen then your technique has a nice smooth transition of force being applied to the handle from the legs, hips, and arms.  Everything from your head to your toes is working together in a nice smooth sequence that results in an efficient application of power.

2. Common Faults

Self Coach Power CurveIf you ever see a double peak or a curve that looks like the profile of the Green Mountains in Vermont there is something missing or room for improvement in your technique.  The power curve represents your rowing technique graphically and that is why it can be used to self coach.  If you were to divide the graph into three sections along the horizontal, the curve at each of those sections would represent how you’re legs, body, and arms are being used to produce force.  If the valley of a double peak curve is in the middle, then you know there is something lacking or missing from how your body/hips are being used through the middle of the drive.  Try to focus on making the curve smoother, eliminating chatter/inefficiency, while emphasizing the swing of your body through the middle.  Can you keep the force/pressure on the handle constant through the middle of the stroke?

3. 5 Minute Warm-Up Challenge

Set the monitor to display the power curve (or force curve) during your next warmup and try the following challenges during each consecutive minute.  Can you create an ideal power curve during each stroke no matter what the challenge?  See the video above for what this warm-up  should look like.

  1. 1min – Legs Only Rowing (Consistent Body Angle/Arms Straight)
  2. 1min – Legs and Body Rowing (Arms Straight)
  3. 1min – Full Strokes @20 strokes/minute
  4. 1min – Full Strokes @24 strokes/minute
  5. 1min – Full Strokes @28 strokes/minute

Watch your power curve on the monitor during every stroke of the 5 minute warm-up.  Is it a smooth inverted parabola?  Where’s the peak?  Is there a double peak that you need to eliminate?  Is there chatter you can eliminate?  Be in control of your stroke at all times and maintain good posture.  If you find something that seems jerky or out of control try to change it and make it different.  Experiment a little and have some fun!  Power Power CurveIf you’re looking for an added challenge, as the stroke rating increases to 24 strokes/minute and then 28 strokes/minute, try to move the peak of the curve to the left and get the curve to start higher up the vertical axis with a very steep slope.  This will mean you’re very connected and getting good initiation with the legs.  The challenge then becomes can you keep the curve smooth and chatter free!

If you’re interested in learning more or getting out on the water, email patrick.larcom@communityrowing.org!

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Congrats to all CRASH-B Competitors! Compete on the water at Community Rowing Inc!

Bob and Coach Pat CRASH-B 2016It’s been a long weekend, but it’s what we live for.  This past weekend I got a chance to interact and brainstorm with some of the best rowing coaches and athletes in the country at the What Works Summit at Community Rowing.  I got to hang out with the 5 alumni classes of the Institute for Rowing Leadership.  Then we all crushed it at CRASH-B 2016.

Erin CRASH-B 2016I was asked many times yesterday if I was racing.  While I would love to get on that Concept2 Erg and test my limits, I had a lot more fun coaching all 5 of the Renegade Rowers who competed yesterday.  Many of them PR’ed and all of them rowed like champs.  I’m proud to say that all of them were rowers yesterday as well as athletes.  They came prepared, went through their warmup, and executed a solid race plan.  All of them left it on the floor and I couldn’t be prouder.

The Renegades CRASH-B 2016So now what?

In the past couple of months I’ve started a new job at Community Rowing Inc.  In my new role I’m able to be the Rowing Ambassador that you know and love for more than just one gym or one community.  My new goal is to spread rowing to as many gyms and communities as possible.

One initiative I’m working on is to help gyms create their own rowing teams that compete and train together every year.  This Spring I will be running the Charles River Rowing League at CRI and I already have 6 gyms creating teams  to compete on the water!  Checkout the flyer below to learn more.  If you’re interested and you have a community or gym that would like to put a team together, please get in touch and I’ll help you make it happen.

Charles River Rowing League 2016

Also, I plan on updating the Renegade Rowing website to focus on consulting and private training.  If you would like to get on the water and become a better rower or get in the gym and get stronger, please get in touch.  If you know any friends in the Boston area who could use Renegade Rowing, please have them sign up for a consultation!

Rowing WOD 2/20/16: 5x1k w/ 4min Rest – Post Fastest and Slowest Times/Splits

Rowing WOD:CFRowing Trainer Course Drills

5 x 1k w/ 4:00 rest

  • Execute Race Pace
  • Row like it’s the middle 1,000m of a 2k

While it’s good to constantly vary your training to push your boundaries, there is something to be said about repetition to build your confidence!  Today’s Rowing WOD is an opportunity to build your aerobic capacity and work on a couple of tactical and technique fixes.

Have a game plan for each piece including the split and stroke rating you want to hold.  Ideally each piece will be done consistently or a little bit faster.  If you’re working on efficiency or sequencing, focus on one fix each piece.  Perhaps you find your breath and rhythm on the first.  Or maybe it’s sequencing and body preparation that needs attention on the second.  If you choose the right pace it will build your confidence and you will be ready to tear up your next 2k and Rowing WOD. Below are some goals and times to think about.  Our next 2k will be at CRASH-B’s on February 28th!

Post your fastest and slowest times!

Interval Time = 3:15; Goal 2k Time = 6:30

Interval Time = 3:30; Goal 2k Time = 7:00

Interval Time = 3:45; Goal 2k Time = 7:30

Interval Time = 4:00; Goal 2k Time = 8:00

Interval Time = 4:15; Goal 2k Time = 8:30

Interval Time = 4:30; Goal 2k Time = 9:00

S&C WOD 2/19/16: AMRAP12 – 12 Air Squats, 9 Push Ups, 6 Box Jumps, 400m Row – Post Score

Strength and Conditioning WOD:

The RRC attacking the 2k Row!

AMRAP12

12 Air Squats

9 Push Ups

6 Box Jumps

400m Row

  • Post Score to Comments.

CRASH-B’s is almost here!  February 28th all of our hard work gets put to the test.  Get in some solid work each day from now until then and be sure you’re recovering and feeling good.

Today’s Focus is Strength and Conditioning. Practice full range of motion in all movements.  If your form is solid, then go as fast as possible.  Push the intensity and get fired up like it’s the third 500m of our CRASH-B’s 2k.

Get after it and have a solid weekend!

Rowing WOD 2/16/16: 4x8min w/ 4min Rest – Post Focus and Avg Splits

Rowing WOD:J Row

4 x 8min w/ 4min Rest

@26-28 s/m (2k+4 to 2k+6)

Deliberate practice is key to success and mastery of any sport.  It’s been said you need to spend at least 10,000 hours to master a discipline whether it’s athletic or otherwise.  While this may be the case the more quality and purpose you bring to your practice the more you’ll get out of it.

Today’s Rowing WOD is an opportunity to bring deliberate practice to your erging.  Row each 8 minute piece at a pace of 2k + 5 seconds.  Meaning if your 2k split is 2:00 /500m (8:00 2k) then you would row each piece today at 2:05 /500m.  Pick 4 things you want to improve about your technique and fix one per piece.  Things you can focus on are keeping level hands, initiating with the legs, smooth tension on the chain, keeping the feet attached to the footboards, or keeping the chest up at the catch.

Post your technique focus and average splits to comments.